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The Most Interesting Fact I Learnt Researching YORUBA Architecture

The architecture of the ancient Yoruba of Southwest Nigeria was a communal endeavor and the house was a statement of individuals social status and position.... A quick slide.

The courtyard design is the root architecture of the Yoruba people, inspired by a culture of honoring family unity. The open spaces or courtyards are designed to be much larger so as to encourage communication between family members, it serves as the point of social contact, cooking and craft making, family meetings, political gatherings, social gatherings like ceremonies and wedding, food processing, worshipping and also used as a court to settle disputes.
In the courtyard was where the ancient Yoruba people lived most of their daily lives.
There are several other interesting facts about Yoruba architecture, the few mentioned where my most interest. I hope you find them interesting. Feel free to mention those you find interesting or not mentioned in the comments section below. Thank you.
Read also:
        - 5 Proposed Standard Elements of Yoruba architecture: Inspiring a Modern Language!

Comments

  1. Nice content architecture

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  2. Replies
    1. Thank you, looking forward to posting more interesting content 🤗

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  3. These are the elements of African architecture that champion the culture and identity of the Great Yoruba people! This knowledge will create the theoretical frameworks for use in developing modern Masterpieces in the built environment that will preserve the identity and heritage of our people for all eternity. We as African creatives should all take note and tell our story this way, the following generations will proudly follow in our footsteps! #yorubaculturalarchitecture #africadefinesarchitecture #yourbadesign #africanarchitect

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